Here’s How Each Personality Type Handles Peer Pressure

Written By Kirsten Moodie

Here’s How Each Personality Type Handles Peer Pressure

Some people find themselves easily susceptible to peer pressure, while others buck against it. Here is how each personality type handles peer pressure.

 

INFJ

INFJs generally dislike the feeling of peer pressure, and might try to avoid it at all costs. Instead of letting themselves be surrounded by people who pressure them, the INFJ is likely to keep away from those individuals. INFJs want to be around people who put them at ease and allow them to be themselves. When they are in situations where they see someone else being pressured, the INFJ will often step in and try to defend that person. They dislike the feeling of themselves or others being pressured into something they don’t truly want to do, and will do their best to stay away from it. When they are younger INFJs can fall into peer pressure, especially if they have trusted the wrong person.

ENFJ

ENFJs often dislike the feeling of peer pressure very much, and will try to avoid it when they can. The issue with ENFJs is that they care very much for others and want to do whatever will make them happiest. They are often susceptible to the pressure of their loved ones, and might give in easier to people they care for. ENFJs certainly dislike feeling like they are being pressured though, and might begin to resent this after a while. They would much prefer to have people in their lives who do not try to manipulative or push them into things.

INFP

INFPs definitely dislike peer pressure, and become very upset when they witness is happening. The INFP might find themselves struggling to hold back, and will likely step in and say something about it. If someone is attempting to pressure the INFP, they will likely begin to dislike that person very much. They are rarely pressured by others, especially as the INFP gets older and more mature. As a young INFP they may struggle with giving into certain pressures, especially since they want to please their loved ones. As the INFP gets older they likely come to realize their own morals, and do not want to bend on them at all.

ENFP

ENFPs can struggle with peer pressure when they are younger, simply because they want to be liked by everyone. They dislike feeling as though someone is not happy with them, because of their warm and caring hearts. ENFPs may give into to certain pressures, since they do not want to be viewed poorly by their peers. As the ENFP grows older, they will likely become more comfortable with themselves and their own morals. When the ENFP realizes there own limits they will begin to become much stronger willed when it comes to pressure.

 

INTJ

INTJs rare struggle with peer pressure, and will likely become angry with people who even bother to try. They know themselves and their limits, and dislike feeling as if someone else is pressuring them. INTJs want to be able to make their own choices in life, and will not be pleased with someone who does not respect this. They will likely find themselves wanting to remove these types of people from their lives completely, as a way to avoid this sort of situation. INTJs believe strongly in boundaries, especially when it comes to people.

ENTJ

ENTJs are strong-willed people, but they are susceptible to certain kinds of peer pressure. If the ENTJ feels challenged by someone, they may feel the need to step up and take them on. They dislike feeling as though someone is looking down on them, and will enjoy the opportunity to prove that person wrong. ENTJs rarely feel pressured in a way that makes them uncomfortable though, and will be perfectly capable of walking away if they truly want to. In most cases the ENTJ simply wants to take on the challenge as a way to prove themselves.

INTP

INTPs definitely dislike feeling peer pressure, and also dislike witnessing others fall victim to it. They prefer to make their own decisions in life, and can usually sense when someone is being manipulative. The INTP will likely not fall victim to peer pressure, and will find themselves walking away from people who continue to push them. INTPs do however struggle when it comes to their loved ones, and might feel easily pressured by someone they are romantically involved with. The INTP is more likely to resent this after a while though, and will want to end the relationship because of it.

ENTP

ENTPs are usually not susceptible to peer pressure, simply because they prefer to make their own choices. ENTPs do however, enjoy trying new things and taking chances. In many situations the ENTP might actually want to be pressured into things, since it helps them to push outside of their own comfort zones. They enjoy being able to explore the possibilities in order to actually learn what they enjoy. Once the ENTP has figured out their boundaries they will likely be very firm and will not let people pressure them. Usually if the ENTP does something it is simply because they want to, and not because someone else has suggested it.

 

ISTJ

ISTJs are very independent people, who often prefer to make their own choices. They dislike being in positions where they feel pressured by others, but can sometimes fall victim to it. If the ISTJ is feeling pressured by peers at work, they might push themselves harder to perform. ISTJs simply want to do their best to please the people in their lives, and want to be a helpful member of their community. If the ISTJ is feeling pressured in a way that makes them feel like they need to work harder, they will sometimes feel overwhelmed.

ESTJ

ESTJs are rarely pressured by others, and simply want to be successful and important members of their community. ESTJs do not enjoy feeling like someone is trying to manipulate them, and will often become angered by this. In some cases the ESTJ can succumb to pressures from their loved ones, simply because they trust and care for those people. They work hard to provide for the people in their lives, and certainly want to feel appreciated for it. ESTJs can also feel pressure by their peers if someone is challenging them, since ESTJs certainly enjoy pushing themselves to perform.

ISFJ

ISFJs can definitely struggle with peer pressure, simply because they want to please others. The ISFJ will feel most pressure from the people they love, and have a hard time staying strong. They simply want to make their loved ones happy and will likely do anything to accomplish this. Their need to please can leave the ISFJ susceptible to peer pressure, especially when it comes to romantic relationships. ISFJs are definitely moral people though, which can sometimes cause a conflict inside of them when it comes to feeling pressured into certain things.

ESFJ

ESFJs can sometimes experience peer pressure when they are younger, and have a hard time ignoring it. When the ESFJ wants to impress others, they will often go to great lengths to do this. If the ESFJ does not develop a strong sense of self, then they will likely struggle with falling victim to peer pressure. They want to make others happy, and this people pleaser mentality can leave the ESFJ an easy target. Some ESFJs might develop a thicker skin as they get older, and become extremely uncomfortable when people try to pressure them. Simply knowing that they are susceptible to peer pressure can cause the ESFJ to overact when they feel someone pushing them.

 

ISTP

ISTPs are extremely unlikely to fall victim to peer pressure, especially as they get older. They dislike feeling like someone is pushing them to do something, and are likely to become angered by this. They want to make their own choices, and prefer to allow other people this as well. ISTPs want to feel free to be themselves, which often causes them to avoid being around other people. The ISTP will likely only want to draw close to people they can trust, who do not push them to be someone else.

ESTP

ESTPs can struggle with peer pressure when they are younger, especially since they want to be liked by others. If the ESTP wants to impress people they care for, they can have a harder time saying “no” to them. ESTPs definitely like being independent though, and will usually grow out of this as they get older. They simply want to be liked by others, and don’t mind taking a few chances in life. ESTPs also enjoy adventure and want to explore new possibilities, which makes them more eager to try new things regardless of other people pressuring them.

ISFP

ISFPs definitely dislike peer pressure and can become very uncomfortable when people try to push them into things. They want to make their own choices in life, and want to feel safe to be themselves. ISFPs can sometimes struggle with peer pressure when they are younger and still figuring out who they are. Once they are developed a strong sense of self awareness and a firm basis of morals, the ISFP will be much more firm in their choices.

ESFP

ESFPs definitely struggle with peer pressure, since they simply want to be liked by others. They want to see other people happy, which causes the ESFP to have a hard time saying “no” to people. Their desire to make life fun and positive, can lead the ESFP to struggle with peer pressure during their younger years. ESFPs are especially susceptible to feeling pressured when it comes to the people they love. They simply do not want to disappoint people, and have tender hearts.

 

 

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