Here’s How Much You Believe in Redemption, Based on Your Personality Type

Some people believe that the idea of redemption is valuable and important. There are others who might feel like redemption is a useless attempt, and that most people cannot truly be redeemed for their actions. Here is how you feel about redemption, based on your personality type.

 

INFJ

INFJs definitely believe in redemption and feel that it is an important part of life. They don’t simply want to write someone off who has made mistakes, instead they value anyone on a path of redemption. INFJs often feel like they need to go through a personal journey to redeem themselves, especially since they can be hard on their own actions. They often search for ways to improve themselves and want to make amends for any past transgressions. INFJs definitely value the idea of redemption, and believe it is something to hold onto.

ENFJ

ENFJs often do believe in the ideal of redemption, and have a deep hope that people can find ways to fix their mistakes. ENFJs don’t like to hold onto the past and do want to see people redeem themselves. When someone has made errors of judgement in the past or continues to do things they shouldn’t, the ENFJ often has hope that they can change their ways. For them redemption is about coming back from a dark place, and finding ways to pull out stronger and more capable.

INFP

INFPs absolutely do believe in the idea of redemption, and often hold this as a powerful and important ideal. They often look at people and see the good in them, and they see their inner potential. INFPs want to see people make a difference and mend their ways. INFPs also enjoy seeing the underdog come out from their failures and become victorious in order to truly redeem themselves in front of others. INFPs believe in redemption likely as one of their core values and beliefs in life.

ENFP

ENFPs do believe in redemption, and often root for the underdog or the person with a dark past. They enjoy seeing people come out of their mistakes or failures and become stronger and better for it. ENFPs hold many deep values that are important to them, and the idea of redemption is definitely one of them. They want to see people come out of these dark places in order to truly redeem themselves in a way that leaves others completely shocked.

 

INTJ

INTJs can sometimes have a hard time accepting that people can redeem themselves. While deep down they likely root for the idea, it can be hard for them to truly believe in it. They often see people making mistakes and have a hard time believing that they will come around. To them it is more important to wait until people actually come through and prove themselves. They will certainly be proud of anyone who can redeem themselves, whether this be coming out of their past transgressions, or redeeming a failure from their past.

ENTJ

ENTJs might hold a hope deep down in the idea of redemption, but they often have a hard time accepting it. They can be a bit cynical when it comes to humanity, and might struggle to believe that most people are capable of changing enough to redeem themselves. When people need to be redeemed for doing bad things in life, the ENTJ will struggle to truly accept their redemption until they see it proven. ENTJs do believe that the attempt of redemption is important, but they won’t believe in it until they witness it firsthand.

INTP

INTPs do often believe in redemption, and are likely to root for the underdog. While they often believe that redemption is an important and valuable ideal, they can also be rather cynical people. INTPs are complex in their way of thinking, holding a cynical outer shell, but deep down having hope for a more idealistic world. They would be truly happy to witness someone redeeming themselves, but they might have a hard time believing that this type of change is possible.

ENTP

ENTPs definitely believe in redemption, or at least hold this ideal as valuable. They often feel it is important to work towards redeeming oneself, and to try and change for the better. ENTPs strive to constantly better themselves, and are often proud of others who do the same. If someone is trying to redeem their mistakes or failures, the ENTP will hold out hope that they can do this. While they won’t entirely believe it until they witness it, they enjoy watching people try to improve.

 

ISTJ

ISTJs can be cynical people, but that doesn’t mean they don’t believe in redemption. In most cases ISTJs prefer people to get things right the first time, and become frustrated when people don’t prepare enough. They hold the ideal that everyone should prepare themselves in order to accomplish their tasks as efficiently as possible. For the ISTJ redemption is truly important when people have made mistakes or failed, and they value someone who works to improve themselves.

ESTJ

ESTJs do strive to redeem themselves and believe that others should do the same. If they ever make mistakes or fail at something the ESTJ wants to redeem themselves by being better than ever before. They strive to get things right the first time though, and prefer to prepare and be as efficient as possible. ESTJs believe that people should do their best to improve whenever they don’t get things right at first, but they can have a hard time believing it until they see it themselves.

ISFJ

ISFJs do believe in redemption, and want to see others achieve this when they have fallen short. They believe in their loved ones, and are deeply caring people. ISFJs don’t like seeing others failing or making mistakes, they can often see the potential within those around them. When the ISFJ witnesses someone making the wrong choices, they often want to help guide them down a path of redemption and will do their best to help.

ESFJ

ESFJs definitely value redemption and believe it is important for people to try and make things right. When someone has made a mistake or has gone down a dark road, the ESFJ often has hope that they can actually redeem themselves. ESFJs believe in people, and can often see the good in those around them. Even when someone has failed or made mistakes, they can see their inner potential and they truly want to witness them redeem themselves.

 

ISTP

ISTPs might believe that redemption is important, but this is more of a personal thing. They don’t focus on the redemption of others and don’t obsess over wanting people to change. ISTPs sometimes struggle with the belief that people actually can change, since they know that most are set in their ways. They would rather live their lives focusing on what matters to them, than constantly striving to redeem any mistakes from the past.

ESTP

ESTPs do believe in redemption to some extent, since they believe in focusing on the present instead of the past. There are times when they can struggle to believe in others though, and are more interested in having things proven to them. Before the ESTP can truly believe in redemption, they have to witness it firsthand. They want to see people actually make a difference before they truly believe in the idea of redemption.

ISFP

ISFPs do believe in redemption and often hold this as an important value. They can see the good in others, which is something that can get them in trouble from time to time. They simply believe that people should strive to improve and they can see the potential in those around them. ISFPs believe in the idea of redemption, and truly want to see people find ways to change any of their past transgressions or failures.

ESFP

ESFPs definitely believe in redemption, and often they believe in those they love. They want to see people redeem themselves and come back from their mistakes. ESFPs don’t like holding onto the past, they prefer to live in the present. For them it is important to focus enjoying the moment, instead of obsessing over any mistakes they might have made. They believe that people can redeem themselves, and they want to see this occur.