INTJ ADHD & ADD: What the INTJs Attention Span is Like

The struggle with personality types and correlating them to things like ADD or ADHD, is the fact that sometimes it is simply part of their personality. Which types are more likely to have these disorders really isn’t something that can easily be measured, and so it is important to take a step back and analyze accordingly. Diving into the traits and differences can help to understand what might cause these types to be misdiagnosed, or what might make them potentially more prone to certain conditions. It is important to understand each individual on a deeper level before making assumptions, since there is far more complex details than simply pegging a personality type as something without learning more.

Being able to focus and get things done is often a natural skill for the INTJ, which makes it less common for them to exhibit behaviors which could confuse them as having ADHD when they do not. When the INTJ does possess these behaviors, it can be rather troubling for them since it goes against their natural desires and behaviors. For the INTJ dealing with this type of things can certainly be a struggle for them, which is why it is important to learn more about how they can cope and understand themselves. It is always important to understand ourselves better, and use as many tools as possible in order to do so.

INTJ and ADHD

Naturally the INTJ is a very focused and direct individual, who enjoys being as efficient as possible. Where others might struggle to maintain a sense of drive, the INTJ actually enjoy putting their energy into getting something done. For them being able to conceive of what they want and push hard to get it, is a very rewarding experience. INTJs use their minds and their strategic planning skills in order to go after the things they want and bring them to fruition in truly impressive ways. For the INTJ maintaining focus on one thing is not difficult, especially when they have something they need to get done. While their minds are often running through many thoughts at once, those thoughts don’t prevent them from accomplishing their tasks. Their rich inner minds are turned into an asset for the INTJ, and they use these many thoughts to come up with plans and useful ways of being even more efficient. 

INTJs can spend hours researching and learning about new subjects and information. They enjoy this time just to focus on the things they are interested in, and work on growing their minds. The INTJ can be seen as a dreamer, since they spend so much time inside of their own thoughts and inner worlds. They also cherish their time alone and become drained when they are constantly surrounded by people. These qualities can cause the INTJ to be misunderstood at times, especially when they are younger. While the INTJ does not struggle to focus on things they are interested in, as a child there are actually some behaviors which can cause them to be misdiagnosed as having ADHD or ADD. INTJs are naturally focused on learning and so in school they might not feel challenged enough. Their minds are often a few steps ahead, they process the information quickly and are ready to move onto something new. This can cause their teachers or adults to see the child INTJ as having trouble focuses, when really they are already prepared for more information and to continue onto the next step. They also struggle with rule following, especially when adults treat them as children. INTJs don’t like simply following instructions because someone tells them to, and have to be sure that it is the most logical and efficient choice. This can certainly cause them to be misunderstood as unruly and troubled as children, when in reality they are simply original thinkers who don’t like following rules which don’t pose logic for them.

The INTJ child does best with parents and teachers who can understand that they are not challenged enough, and need to have information which pushes their unique minds in the right direction. Without having something to keep them interested and constantly moving forward, the INTJ simply becomes bored and feels stagnant in a rather negative manner. They also need things explained with logic even as children instead of adults trying to demand things of them without giving them a reason they can comprehend and attach to.

For the INTJ who does have ADHD, this can be a very frustrating thing for them. They often see the steps they need to take but struggle to remain focused, and will constantly feel a sense of guilt over this. INTJs want to be able to focus on one thing and so not having this come naturally for them, goes against who they are the goals which they so desire. It is important for the INTJ to truly seek the right attention for this, or else they will become unhappy with themselves and constantly feel like they are failing when it is not at all their doing. INTJs need things they can focus on and goals they attain without constantly having things preventing them from doing this. The INTJ with ADHD feels even more misunderstood, likely wanting to alienate themselves from those around them who simply don’t understand where they are coming from. For the INTJ it is necessary to have logical reasons for things, and so researching their situation is often the best way for them to find ways to improve and seek help in the right ways.